Query doesn’t return results

[ 2] bitmalloc     : ```$ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d '{me(_xid_: alice) { name _xid_ follows { name _xid_ follows {name _xid_ } } }}'
{"server_latency":{"json":"69.022µs","parsing":"358.699µs","processing":"490.95µs","total":"923.166µs”}}
[ 3] bitmalloc     : it’s essentially the same as what is in the readme
[ 4] bitmalloc     : # Make Alice follow Bob, and give them names.
$ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d $'mutation { set {<alice> <follows> <bob> . \n <alice> <name> "Alice" . \n <bob> <name> "Bob" . }}'

# Now run a query to find all the people Alice follows 2 levels deep. The query would only result in 1 connection, Alice to Bob.
$ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d '{me(_xid_: alice) { name _xid_ follows { name _xid_ follows {name _xid_ } } }}'

# Make Bob follow Greg.
$ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d $'mutation { set {<bob> <follows> <greg> . \n <greg> <name> "Greg" .}}'

# The same query as above now would now show 2 connections, one from Alice to Bob, another from Bob to Greg.
$ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d '{me(_xid_: alice) { name _xid_ follows { name _xid_ follows {name _xid_ } } }}’```
[ 5] ashwin95r     : Umm I guess the mutation didn't happen
[ 6] ashwin95r     : @mrjn, is the flag for mutation off by default?
[ 7] nii236        : I know we established that you can only go S -> O but nto O -> S
[ 8] bitmalloc     : this is the log entry on the server for the mutation request:
root@6cc3de7f3b64:/go/src/github.com/dgraph-io/dgraph/cmd/dgraph# ./dgraph --mutations /dgraph/m --postings /dgraph/p --uids /dgraph/u
2016/06/22 04:14:01 num_cpu: 2. prev_maxprocs: 2. Set max procs to num cpus
2016/06/22 04:14:01 Server started. Clients connected.
2016/06/22 04:14:01 Listening for requests at port: 8080
2016/06/22 04:14:01 Worker listening at address: [::]:12345
2016/06/22 04:14:01 Client worker listening: [::]:8081
2016/06/22 04:14:41 List merge counters. added: 0 merged: 7 clean: 0 pending: 0 mapsize: 7 dirtysize: 0
2016/06/22 04:16:41 List merge counters. added: 0 merged: 4 clean: 0 pending: 0 mapsize: 11 dirtysize: 0
[ 9]               : 
[10] pawan         : hey change the port to `8080`
[11]               : 
[12] pawan         : Or are you running it using Docker?
[13] bitmalloc     : port 8080 -> 80 in docker
[14] mrjn          : @nii236: Yeah. We won't be doing that. If people want it, they'll have to create a predicate in the opposite direction. Freebase data has that -- predicates going both directions.
[15] nii236        : no worries, I’ve just finished manually adding reverse preds
[16] pawan         : I see that you built this from master, could you try this with `docker pull dgraph/dgraph:latest` @bitmalloc?
[17] mrjn          : Did you add the data first, via mutations? @bitmalloc
[18] bitmalloc     : yeah, I did: $ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d $'mutation { set {<alice> <follows> <bob> . \n <alice> <name> "Alice" . \n <bob> <name> "Bob" . }}’ for the mutation, just like it’s in the README
[19] mrjn          : Can you post the output from that as well?
[20] mrjn          : In fact, we might have to dig deeper here, so maybe a discuss post is better suited. @pawan wisemonk magic?
[21] bitmalloc     : `{"code":"E_OK","message":"Done”}`

@bitmalloc says:

$ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d $'mutation { set {<alice> <follows> <bob> . \n <alice> <name> "Alice" . \n <bob> <name> "Bob" . }}'

{"code":"E_OK","message":"Done"}


$ curl localhost:80/query -X POST -d '{me(_xid_: alice) { name _xid_ follows { name _xid_ follows {name _xid_ } } }}'
{"server_latency":{"json":"69.022µs","parsing":"358.699µs","processing":"490.95µs","total":"923.166µs"}}

No results

When running this, I get this error:

2016/06/22 15:29:22 Error while retrieving subgraph root: Expected some name. Got: lex.Item [7] "}"

Looks like a lexing issue.

This fixes it: